TEARS offers limited after-hour service

The Emma Animal Rescue Society (TEARS) in Sunnydale, is the only animal rescue organisation that operates a limited after-hours veterinary service to far south pet owners.

The Emma Animal Rescue Society (TEARS) in Sunnydale, is the only animal rescue organisation that operates a limited after-hours veterinary service to far south pet owners.

The TEARS Veterinary Hospital, headed up by Dr Tania Hauer, is open seven days a week, from 8am to 4.30pm. The veterinary team, which deals with an average of 40 patients a day, including at least five rescue-related emergencies, includes Dr Nico Labuschagne, three qualified animal welfare assistants and two animal welfare assistant trainees.

TEARS operations manager Mandy Storer said while TEARS closes its doors at 4.30pm, it continues to operate two mobile clinic vehicles until 9pm, providing a limited after-hour service to the four low-income communities.

She said after-hours mobile clinic teams are busy every night, mostly in Ocean View, with cases ranging from animals that need emergency treatment for biliary or parvo, or due to injuries sustained from hit-and-run incidents.

“Most of the cases we’re treating, many of which have been left too long by the time TEARS receives the call, are preventable through regular vaccination and tick and flea treatments. The TEARS animal welfare assistants on duty are qualified to provide basic vet care and pain relief, and where there is a life-threatening emergency or an animal is suffering, they will refer the case to the vet on call for telephonic veterinary guidance or facilitate the appropriate treatment. In instances where TEARS is unable to assist, pet owners will be referred to the Cape Animal Medical Centre in Kenilworth,” said Ms Storer.

TEARS general manager Lauren Carlyle, said the aim is to build TEARS a permanent home on the Wenga Farm, where the TEARS Cattery is currently situated, and to develop and secure funding for the first 24/7 animal rescue and veterinary hospital in the southern peninsula. However, she said, it was unlikely to happen before 2024.

“Currently TEARS simply doesn’t have the resources to deploy the medical and emergency staff that would be required, beyond the limited after-hour service we currently offer.”

TEARS head of fundraising, Lara van Rensburg, believes that much of the burden being placed on TEARS and local veterinary resources could be reduced by stepping up current sterilisation, vaccination, and tick and flea treatment programmes.

The public can help by donating to pay for a spay, sponsoring tick and flea treatments, providing pet food support for vulnerable pets, or adopting a rescue dog or cat that will enable TEARS to give another animal a life-changing second chance.

To donate please click here: https://tears.devman.co.za/devman/online/vetoutreach/ or visit www.tears.org.za